Friday, July 24, 2015

Fangirl





As one step closer to our general self-improvement, my book club decided to create our list for the year by alternating contemporary and classic works. We all enjoyed Girl on a Train and The Light We Cannot See, but our most recent choice was a classic one.

          We just finished The House of Mirth and even though I’ve read Edith Wharton before, I’m smitten. I don’t think I need to provide you with any other explanation than the following excerpts which I found I had to write down, if only to savor them that much longer.

“The girl’s face turned to her companion like an empty plate held up to be filled.”

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“She always entered the conversation with a handspring.”

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“She was not accustomed to the joys of solitude except in company.”

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“. . . all the guileless confidence of a young girl who has always been told there’s no one richer than her father.”

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“. . the sugar maples wavered like pyres of light.”

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“The two had the same prejudices and ideals, and the same quality of making other standards non-existent by ignoring them.”

 Need I say more?

12 comments:

  1. I had to read Ethan Frome twice, once in high school and once in college. It rather put me off Edith. But your quotes inspire me to try again.

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    1. Never been a real Ethan Frome fan, myself.
      House of Mirth was a scathing commentary on the life and mores of the time.

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  2. I really, really, really must get round to reading her. Would you suggest that I start with The House of Mirth?

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    1. I found it to be a real page-turner.

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  3. I have not read her, famous though she is. I guess I will have to do that!!

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  4. I have read others of hers but not I think this one. Thank you. I will add it to my wish list. And my towering un-read towers.

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  5. I've never read anything by Edith Wharton.Maybe I should.

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  6. I read "The House of Mirth" years ago and remember liking it a lot. I went through an Edith Wharton phase when I first moved to New York City and she IS terrific. I also read both "All the Light We Cannot See" and "Girl on a Train" this summer. Both great!

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  7. The gal can turn a phrase and I will have to see if she is in my library. You got me interested.

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  8. No need, she is only 99 cents on Amazon.

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  9. I haven't ever read any of Edith Wharton, I'll check my local library. No sense buying any until I decide if I like them or not.

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Thanks for stopping by and I'd love to hear what you think.